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Where are our drones?

Well, its been endoftermitis over here for us! We have been to all the events, end of term concerts, music exams (distinction, so proud), assemblies, sports days, my own assignment results (I passed by the way) and training for Ride London (not me, not on your nelly, thats the hubby).

So we popped up just to check the hive was still there. We should be visiting every week so must up our game.  We decided to give them the sugar solution again as there is slow spreading into the new frames though it is starting to happen. The queen was there and my, there were alot of bees, plenty of eggs and lots of capped cells.

Where are the drones?

Right so, in case we need a recap there are three types of bee in a hive. One queen, lots of workers, and at different times of the year several thousands or several hundreds of drones or none at all.
The job of the drone is to fertilise the queen, when they have done that they are not much help. They spend time in the hive, eating the honey and not doing…

Whats that wormy thing?

We went to see the bees today as we had to move the sugar solution away from them. Too much of that and the honey will taste a bit funny. Though of course this year we are unlikely to taste it ourselves so not sure what we were worrying about. The bees have to have it to see them through the winter since they have only just started this lark and need to build reserves.

They have been busy but I realised today I am not sure what I was looking at. The brood box should have eggs - Yes, saw those, Larvae - Yes, think so and capped cells with larvae growing in them, soon to become bees. Mmmm, I am not sure about those. There was lots of things going on, which I am going to have to investigate.

I am pretty sure there was honey, and capped cells but there were also black cells, bit of a worry and one cell with a funny looking worm thing in it!!!

Hubby tried to photo it but turns out you cannot get an Iphone to take pictures if you are wearing marigolds so think we missed it. We are going to have to engage our bee buddy for advice.





The white bits are capped (covered over) honey cells, I think, these have a wax topping.






The pale yellow cells are worker brood cells. the gaps are left there by the queen so some of the bees can go in and keep the adjacent cells warm.

Drone are male bees who fertilise the queen and look after her, they do not sting. The workers are of course female and go out foraging. There is only ever one queen at a time, when more than one appears there is a showdown.

We also managed, since we are newbies to anger the bees a bit. We pushed them off the top of the frame with the hive tool (pointy thing used to lever the hive open as it gets stuck down with propolis). We were very gentle but they didn't like that much and started buzzing quite a bit. I wished we had set the smoker alight then but we hadn't bothered. Learning point number 2 light the smoker before you open the hive.




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Looking good!

Pouring with rain today for 10 mins or so I know not best timing but that when we delivered our hive to the apiary. Moving from our lounge to the apiary is certain to increase our chances of bees taking up residence.

Note the hubby standing in the dry patch under the trees.






We left the super on, realise thats a mistake but since its currently empty not sure it matters yet.

Deadlines, deadlines

We should have visited the bees today, just to check all is well, they have enough to eat, they are settling in, checking any problems with the neighbours etc etc, but we didn't. Work got in the way today, plus it really is too hot to be wearing the kit!


We got this - see below -  from the National Bee Unit, we've got the sugar in and we are making up the solution tomorrow, we don't want to be responsible for starvation!

Beekeepers may wish to monitor their colony food levels closely, particularly in any splits, nucleus colonies or colonies where the entire spring honey crop was removed. In some areas of the UK, our Inspectors are concerned at finding colonies that are starving.Feed can be prepared from refined white sugar and water mixed at a 2:1 ratio or one of the proprietary ready mixed syrups available from Beekeeping equipment suppliers.